Regional Gastrointestinal Consultants

Anal Fissures

Anal Fissures

Anal Fissures

Overview

The anal canal is a short tube surrounded by muscle at the end of your rectum. The rectum is the bottom section of your colon (large intestine). An anal fissure (also called fissure-in-ano) is a small rip or tear in the lining of the anal canal. Fissures are common, but are often confused with other anal conditions, such as hemorrhoids.

The most common cause of an anal fissure is the passage of very hard or watery stools. The crack in the anal lining exposes the underlying muscles that control the passage of stool through the anus and out of the body. An anal fissure is one of the most painful problems because the exposed muscles become irritated from exposure to stool or air, and leads to intense burning pain, bleeding, or spasm after bowel movements.

Symptoms

Anal fissures typically cause a sharp pain that starts with the passage of stool. This pain may last several minutes to a few hours. As a result, many patients may try not to have bowel movements to prevent pain. Other symptoms include:

Bright red blood on the stool or toilet paper after a bowel movement A small lump or skin tag on the skin near the anal fissure (more common when chronic)

It should be noted that Anal fissures do not increase the risk of colon cancer nor cause it. However, more serious conditions can cause similar symptoms. Even when a fissure has healed completely, your colon and rectal surgeon may request other tests. A colonoscopy may be done to rule out other causes of rectal bleeding.

Treatment

Treatments for anal fissures include surgical and nonsurgical methods. Nonsurgical methods such as pain medicine, dietary fiber to reduce the occurrence of large, bulky stools, and sitz baths (sitting in a few inches of warm water) are common. If these treatments don’t relieve pain, surgery might be needed to decrease spasm in the sphincter muscle.

Nonsurgical Treatment

A high-fiber diet and over-the-counter fiber supplements (25-35 grams of fiber/day) to make stools soft, formed, and bulky. Over-the-counter stool softeners to make stools easier to pass. Drinking more water to help prevent hard stools and aid in healing. Warm tub baths (sitz baths) for 10 to 20 minutes, a few times per day (especially after bowel movements to soothe the area and help relax anal sphincter muscles). This is thought to help the healing process. Medications, such as lidocaine, that can be applied to the skin around the anus for pain relief. Medications such as diltiazam, nifedipine, or nitroglycerin ointment to relax the anal sphincter muscles which helps the healing process.

Surgical Treatment

Although most anal fissures do not require surgery, chronic fissures are harder to treat and surgery may be the best option. The goal of surgery is to help the anal sphincter muscle relax which reduces pain and spasms, allowing the fissure to heal. Surgical options include Botulinum toxin (Botox®) injection into the anal sphincter or surgical division of an inner part of the anal sphincter (lateral internal sphincterotomy). Your colon and rectal surgeon will find the best treatment for you and discuss the risks of surgery. Both types of surgery are typically done as same-day outpatient procedures. 

IMPORTANT HEALTH NOTE

We recommend that people experiencing gastrointestinal symptoms do not attempt self-treatment. With many medications being available over the counter, and numerous do-it-yourself online unqualified remedy recommendation, it is natural to consider treating yourself but we highly recommend against this.

If you are experiencing gastrointestinal symptoms you may have a more significant issue than you would expect from the sometimes muted or infrequent symptom you may be experiencing. It is important to keep in mind that is you are having gastrointestinal symptoms or concerns it is best see a doctor to have those symptoms diagnosed and any conditions treated. Also, it is worth noting, that if health conditions do exist, the earlier they are diagnosed and treated, the greater the probability will be to successfully eliminate or manage a present condition, in fact successful outcomes will increase significantly with early detection.

If you have gastrointestinal concerns or are experiencing any gastrointestinal symptoms, please contact us promptly to schedule a consultation with a physician.


DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general information. In no way, does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a best in class physician regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today at (215) 321-4700 to schedule a consultation.